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So what is Living Will really all about? The following report includes some fascinating information about Living Will–info you can use, not just the old stuff they used to tell you.

In 1969, Illinois lawyer Louis Kutner first proposed the idea of living wills. Although the concept was received, the use of living wills faced many challenges particularly in cases when the testator, the person who made the living will, failed to clearly translate his health care desires into paper and so left rooms for confusion and misinterpretation. But over the years, the concept of living will has been explored and standardized. The contents of a living will, particularly, are becoming more encompassing and specific, thereby helping the doctors carry out medical wishes and the family in easing the burden.

Living wills come in different wordings, but the content says the same thing: The patient is given the right to decide for his medical care even in the bed of unconsciousness, terminal illness, or vegetative state. Specifically, the living will touches the following areas:

1. Declaration of sound-mindedness at the time of making the living will. The testator affirms that he is in a reasonably perfect state of mind to decide on his medical wishes and to understand their implications and that all decisions are made willfully, voluntarily, and without the presence of any kind of pressure. This have to be made sure because whatever wishes indicated in the living will would be actualized and would determine whether to withdraw or continue any medical intervention.

2. Possible medical scenarios. These may include comatose, vegetative state, permanent disability, brain damage (both terminal and not), and chronic illness. For each medical scenario, the testator chooses whether to undergo treatments and if so, under what specific goal. It can be to sustain life, to attempt to cure, to provide comfort, etc. Additionally, the testator can specifically state his refusal of life-sustaining or life-prolonging measures, should bringing the desired quality of life is impossible and death is imminent. It is important to note, however, that a living will is not supposed to include unwarranted requests like euthanasia, administration of unnecessary and inappropriate medications, and the likes.

You may not consider everything you just read to be crucial information about Living Will. But don’t be surprised if you find yourself recalling and using this very information in the next few days.

3. Appeal that the living will be honored. The testator requests that the attending physicians and family members honor the directives stated in the living will.

4. Statement of possible revocation. The testator reserves the right to revoke the living will at any time. But unless the living will is revoked, it would remain active and must represent the wishes of the testator.

5. Declaration of witnesses. The witnesses testify that the testator is emotionally, legally, and mentally capable of making the decisions and that he understands the implications of the stated health care desires. They also state that they are not in any way related to the testator by blood or marriage, do not represent the testator?s doctors or attending hospital, and are not beneficiaries of the testator?s estate.

6. Signatures of the testator and witnesses. The living will is duly signed to make it legally binding. Any unsigned living will is considered invalid.

The contents of a living will should be carefully reviewed before notarizing, if required by the state, and filing. It is also important to update the living will periodically, as beliefs change over time and new medical treatments, which the testator may either like or dislike to receive, are introduced each year.

About the Author
By El Calvito, feel free to visit his top ranked affiliate site: elcalvito.zeekrewards

Indeed, what is a living will? We might have encountered this situation before or know someone who did in the past. You might have heard it movies or in television shows but have no idea at all what it is. In its most technical sense, a living will is a legal document issued by individuals which specifies specific course actions that should be taken concerning their health in the event that they (the person who issued the living will) are incapable of making any decisions due to illness or incapacity. Other states might have a different term for it but most often living wills are also referred to as advance health care directives, an advance directives or advance decisions. But for the sake of our discussion, let?s stick with living will.

Just for the sake of being clear, imagine yourself being in an accident and ended up in a coma. Your doctors informed your next of kin that your current situation is less likely to improve for some time. Your family would debate about your situation and would be in a dilemma whether to continue life sustaining treatment. If you have a living will, your specific wishes on these life sustaining treatments will be followed by your doctors as long as everything is legal is legal, of course.

The legality of the document will depend on the mental state of the person during the time he/she signed the papers. He/she needs to be in a sound mind and knows the every bit of consequence the document will have. The document also needs to be quite specific. It needs to cite the kinds of requested future treatments. And most importantly, a living will is voluntary. If proven that the person signed the document under duress, the legality of the living will is no longer valid.

So far, we’ve uncovered some interesting facts about Living Will. You may decide that the following information is even more interesting.

As part of this requirement, it is imperative that your witnesses in the document are by no means related by blood, marriage, adoption or have any claims to inheritance to whatever properties you will leave behind. Even your physicians, any employee of your hospital or health facility and your attorneys for health care cannot be your witnesses. The document can be revoked anytime, however, whether you?re mentally capable or competent, does not matter. But remember that once you signed the document, it is valid until you die.

The contents of the will can be as detailed as to avoid any form of antibiotics. But at the same time it can still be quite broad like do all life sustaining treatments available during that time. This one, however, would still be based on the assessments of your medical team.

What is a living will? It is an option. It is something that you can think about today in order to make it easier for your love ones to decide in case situations called for it. Just be certain that you tell someone that you have this legal document lying around. Your health care proxy should be informed for the document is no good if no one knows about it.

About the Author
By El Calvito, feel free to visit his top ranked affiliate site: elcalvito.zeekrewards

You should be able to find several indispensable facts about Living Will in the following paragraphs. If there’s at least one fact you didn’t know before, imagine the difference it might make.

How you would like to be cared for in the event of permanent unconsciousness or end-of life situations is not the most comfortable topic to discuss. However, it is necessary. In case it does happen, how would your doctor know whether you want to be resuscitated? Or be on life support? Or be artificially fed? There is no other way of knowing than reading your living will. But making a living will is a critical process; after all, it expresses what kind of medical care you want or don?t want to receive in case your are unable to communicate it.

States have differing laws and standards to follow in making a living will, so it pays to know what are instituted in your state. Yet, there are general guidelines that can help you. They are the following:

Think about your medical wishes
In specific terms, outline what types of treatment and procedure you would like to undergo, under what circumstances, and for how long. For example, you can detail that you want to be on mechanical ventilation if there are chances of survival. But if beyond recovery, you refuse to be on any type of support that artificially prolongs your life. Be specific as you can. Your living will is perhaps one document you wish to never use, but even then, you need to make your living will as clear as possible; otherwise, your loved ones will be left guessing, and misinterpretations will not be impossible.

Knowledge can give you a real advantage. To make sure you’re fully informed about Living Will, keep reading.

Talk to your doctor
Explain your medical wishes to your doctor and make sure he understands them. This will avoid the possibility of misinterpretations and conflicts that may arise when you use your living will. Also, this will allow your doctor to give input and explain the implications of your medical wishes.

Involve your family
Your family needs to be informed of your preferences, so they will know exactly what to do in case you become incapacitated. Many family tensions result from making medical decisions, and you don?t want that to happen among your family members. As early as now, let them understand how you want to be taken care of. It?s possible that your medical wishes would face opposition, but listen to your family?s opinions and consider their inclusion in your living will.

Have a living will form
You can get if from your state?s health department, hospital, aging agency, or certain websites. Complete the form. Add other details in case the form doesn?t cover certain medical wishes you have. You can also work with a lawyer to guide you through the process and discuss with you the legal implications of your living will. In some states, however, the assistance of a lawyer is sometimes unnecessary. Based on your state law, have it notarized or witnessed. Then, distribute copies to your family and close friends, doctor, and lawyer.

Keep your living will properly
After making a living will, make sure to properly keep it in your files or somewhere it would be quickly found if needed. Some people like to keep it in a safe-deposit box, which is not advisable, as doing so would make it hard to retrieve.

This article’s coverage of the information is as complete as it can be today. But you should always leave open the possibility that future research could uncover new facts.

About the Author
By Dennis Pehrson, feel free to visit his top ranked site: Riches with Rentals

Would you like to find out what those-in-the-know have to say about Living Will? The information in the article below comes straight from well-informed experts with special knowledge about Living Will.

A living will is a special document that has legal and binding authority. It is written specifically by a person to detail his wishes and requests covering specific medical procedures and treatments needed in case of adverse medical conditions. If you become unable to speak or decide about getting medical attention, the living will could be your way of being in control and having to decide for your life. The decision could not be made on the moment itself but it could be written in anticipation.

There are just many other information and things people should learn about living will. In definition, a living will, and all other legal advance directives, is a written instruction about a person?s specific medical care preferences and choices. If you make one, your family and your doctor would automatically consult the document in case you become unable to decide for yourself regarding significant medical treatments and procedures. Take note that the document could be drafted and prepared by you, but there should be legal or lawyer?s assistance and presence to make it valid and binding.

For sure, the living will may not be equally important and necessary as a will (last testament) or a living trust, but more and more people nowadays are deciding to have one, with regards to high medical costs. In comparison, a last will (more popularly known simply as ?will?) is also a legal document that is duly signed by a person in the presence of a legal witness who describes how that person wishes his assets and wealth to be divided by family and descendants upon death. Most opulent people are advised to have a will at hand. In fact, some wealthy individuals start to write their will early in life and subject that testament to numerous modifications and changes as time goes on.

Sometimes the most important aspects of a subject are not immediately obvious. Keep reading to get the complete picture.

For its part, the living trust is mostly considered as an alternative to will or last will. It also details distribution of estate of a person during and beyond his lifetime. The owner of the estate designates a trustee to manage all his declared assets, which would then be automatically transferred into the possession of the trustee. Thus, in a living trust, the person or estate owner need not be dead for the assets to be turned over to other people.

Any person could always specify in the living will the desire to have any of body organs removed and donated to other people who need transplants. Some people still are not aware of this. The body could even be donated to any medical school that is always in need of corpses for medical and scientific studies.

A living will is effective only when the person becomes incapacitated. He should not be able to decide or say what treatments he wants or not wants. Normally, in such instances, it is the family who takes the burden of decision. But people who want to spare their family from making such difficult task decide to pre-empt any medical decision through having a living will.

Before the living will is implemented, there must be a necessary and appropriate certification from a doctor that the person is truly suffering from a terminal condition or that he is permanently unconscious.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, proud owner of this top ranked web hosting reseller site: GVO

Have you ever wondered if what you know about Living Will is accurate? Consider the following paragraphs and compare what you know to the latest info on Living Will.

In 1969, Illinois lawyer Louis Kutner first proposed the idea of living wills. Although the concept was received, the use of living wills faced many challenges particularly in cases when the testator, the person who made the living will, failed to clearly translate his health care desires into paper and so left rooms for confusion and misinterpretation. But over the years, the concept of living will has been explored and standardized. The contents of a living will, particularly, are becoming more encompassing and specific, thereby helping the doctors carry out medical wishes and the family in easing the burden.

Living wills come in different wordings, but the content says the same thing: The patient is given the right to decide for his medical care even in the bed of unconsciousness, terminal illness, or vegetative state. Specifically, the living will touches the following areas:

1. Declaration of sound-mindedness at the time of making the living will. The testator affirms that he is in a reasonably perfect state of mind to decide on his medical wishes and to understand their implications and that all decisions are made willfully, voluntarily, and without the presence of any kind of pressure. This have to be made sure because whatever wishes indicated in the living will would be actualized and would determine whether to withdraw or continue any medical intervention.

2. Possible medical scenarios. These may include comatose, vegetative state, permanent disability, brain damage (both terminal and not), and chronic illness. For each medical scenario, the testator chooses whether to undergo treatments and if so, under what specific goal. It can be to sustain life, to attempt to cure, to provide comfort, etc. Additionally, the testator can specifically state his refusal of life-sustaining or life-prolonging measures, should bringing the desired quality of life is impossible and death is imminent. It is important to note, however, that a living will is not supposed to include unwarranted requests like euthanasia, administration of unnecessary and inappropriate medications, and the likes.

I trust that what you’ve read so far has been informative. The following section should go a long way toward clearing up any uncertainty that may remain.

3. Appeal that the living will be honored. The testator requests that the attending physicians and family members honor the directives stated in the living will.

4. Statement of possible revocation. The testator reserves the right to revoke the living will at any time. But unless the living will is revoked, it would remain active and must represent the wishes of the testator.

5. Declaration of witnesses. The witnesses testify that the testator is emotionally, legally, and mentally capable of making the decisions and that he understands the implications of the stated health care desires. They also state that they are not in any way related to the testator by blood or marriage, do not represent the testator?s doctors or attending hospital, and are not beneficiaries of the testator?s estate.

6. Signatures of the testator and witnesses. The living will is duly signed to make it legally binding. Any unsigned living will is considered invalid.

The contents of a living will should be carefully reviewed before notarizing, if required by the state, and filing. It is also important to update the living will periodically, as beliefs change over time and new medical treatments, which the testator may either like or dislike to receive, are introduced each year.

About the Author
By Dennis Pehrson, feel free to visit his top ranked site: Riches with Rentals

Do you ever feel like you know just enough about Living Will to be dangerous? Let’s see if we can fill in some of the gaps with the latest info from Living Will experts.

Deciding to make a living will is one story; completing a living will form is another. Fortunately, living will forms are now standardized, and although they differ from state to state, most of the content is the same. Therefore, wherever the living will form comes from, filling it out is manageable.

Following are some of the tips for handling living forms. Carefully observe them when making your living will.

1. Read and understand the content. If, however, you find it hard to understand some of the terms, especially the medical terms, look for someone who can clearly explain them to you. You can contact a friend or a relative who has already done a living will, someone from the state health department, or a lawyer. The thing is, do not interpret them on your own. Remember, a living will involves serious medical decisions. And making bad decisions due to misinterpretation is not a happy thought. Of course, you can revoke or make revisions in the existing living will, but what if it is too late?

2. Understand that because living wills are state-specific, some states may not honor living wills done in other states. This, therefore, necessitates making another living will in case of relocation. The only exception is when the provisions in the state where the living will was made are aligned with the ones in the present state location.

If you base what you do on inaccurate information, you might be unpleasantly surprised by the consequences. Make sure you get the whole Living Will story from informed sources.

3. Draft a personal living will in addition to the state-recommended living will form if your form does not cover some areas of your concern or if you desire to add other details. Only make sure to write in a clear manner, as ambiguous statements can be subject to misinterpretation. Check for spelling and grammar errors, which if left uncorrected, may change what you have originally intended to mean. Proofread if you must. However, if making your own personal living will can be a bit of a problem, you can choose to have a lawyer to draft it for you.

4. Check the laws existing in your state regarding living wills. This way, you will be more aware of the policies and limitations of living wills. Do not just fill out the form. If the form is executed outside the requisites of the state laws, it might be considered invalid.

5. Appoint a health care proxy if the living will form requires you to. This should be a person who knows you well, has the ability to uphold your medical wishes no matter what, and can anticipate the medical decisions you would make if you are capable to. Although a spouse, kid, or parent is a good choice, any of them may decide based on emotions. And this can potentially jeopardize your wishes. It is much better to choose someone who will less likely become emotional and will remain strong and objective all throughout. It can be your best friend or a cousin.

Though completing a living will form is relatively easy, it is sometimes depressing. After all, it is all about preparing for end-of-life situations. But don?t let the idea of death defeat you. Living will forms should give you a realistic view of any possibility.

There’s a lot to understand about Living Will. We were able to provide you with some of the facts above, but there is still plenty more to write about in subsequent articles.

About the Author
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The following article presents the very latest information on Living Will. If you have a particular interest in Living Will, then this informative article is required reading.

Living will is a legal document wherein you are giving instructions about medical procedures and treatments you want to receive should you get involved in a life threatening situation. In general, the document could be taken as your wish or request to medical practitioners and healthcare providers in case you get into a condition when you would not be able to speak for yourself or decide whether you like a certain medical procedure to be performed to you.

Of course, as you write your living will, you could not in any way point out and identify what specific medical situations you might get into. You could be involved in a fatal accident or be subject to a homicide attempt. An underlying medical condition might arise or you might suffer from a contagious disease that would leave you incapable or medically unconscious. In any way, you should take a look at specific medical treatments and procedures. It would help if you would discuss with your medical doctor all possible issues and angles regarding your living will.

Here are specific medical procedures or treatments that you could include in your living will. You may wish to specifically receive or not receive these processes. Of course, there are many factors that could cloud your judgment today like the pain involved and the possibility of success. In any way, many people also consider the possible hefty medical costs. Some do not want to undergo specific medical procedures because they do not want their families to incur expensive bills or they do not want their assets to thin out.

Is everything making sense so far? If not, I’m sure that with just a little more reading, all the facts will fall into place.

Mechanical ventilation. If you find it hardest to breathe, there may be a need to undergo a mechanical ventilation or use a breathing machine. The equipment would breathe for you so your life could be prolonged and you could be assisted until you fully recover. Many people do not like the ideas especially because in many cases, people who are forced to breathe through such machines usually do not survive, but only prolong life for some days, weeks, or months. The procedure could be very costly, needless to say.

Resuscitation. This is the process wherein the heart is restarted in case it has stopped pumping up and beating. This is usually administered to people who undergo cardiac death. When writing your living will, determine first the need and the duration for any resuscitation through a cardiopulmonary resuscitation or CPR procedure. There could also be a need for an electric device that would deliver electrical shock to help stimulate heart and make it beat again.

Dialysis. Many people do not like the idea of having to undergo dialysis. This is because once it has started, the person would need to regularly undergo it for life. This procedure is removing wastes from your blood. It is a substitute to the overall function and usefulness of the kidney.

Hydration and nutritional assistance. This basically supplies the human body with necessary fluids and nutrients in an intravenous mode through a tube that would be connected to stomach. The living will could or could not include this procedure, depending on the person?s preferences and decision, based on duration and costs.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, now offering the host then profit baby plan for only $1 over at Host Then Profit

In today’s world, it seems that almost any topic is open for debate. While I was gathering facts for this article, I was quite surprised to find some of the issues I thought were settled are actually still being openly discussed.

No one can really prevent the uncertainties; yet, anyone can prepare for their occurrence. It is true with medical conditions. You may not completely avoid illnesses and accidents that may render you almost lifeless and unconscious, but you can set beforehand how you would like to be cared for during such events through a living will. The benefits of a living will are numerous. And they protect your family as much as they do you. Here?s a quick rundown:

1. You stay in control. When you have a living will, you can decide on things you have otherwise no control of. You can, for instance, decide what kinds of medical intervention you would like to receive or how long you want to be on life support. Without a living will, the decision is entirely left to your family and doctors. And it?s likely that their decisions would not be agreeable to you.

2. You make things easy for your family and friends. Seeing you in a vegetative state or in permanent unconsciousness would sure break your loved ones? hearts. But you can spare them this kind of emotional torture by instructing in your living will to withhold life support if it only attempts to artificially delay death.

3. There would be no arguments within the family. Deciding on sustaining the life of a loved one or allowing the natural course of death is a completely painful task. It?s so hard because each family member has a differing opinion. One may like to continue the artificial nourishment, the other one may not. The parent may desire to keep the life support, the spouse may not. If there is an outstanding living will, however, factions like these would be eliminated, as your family would have to rely on your living will and honor whatever that is written.

If you base what you do on inaccurate information, you might be unpleasantly surprised by the consequences. Make sure you get the whole Living Will story from informed sources.

4. Doctors would be more guided in administering medical intervention. Because the doctors know exactly what you want, it would be less hard for them to choose from available treatment options for you.

5. You get to discuss the end-of-life possibilities with your loved ones. Although this would not be a relatively happy conversation, this would bring awareness to your household about illness, injury, accident, and death. In the end, your family members would at least be better prepared in handling any eventuality.

6. You have your peace of mind. By ensuring that you get the health care that you want and that your family is spared from the task of deciding for your life, you get the sense of peace that only comes from being in control.

7. You preserve your right. Among the benefits of a living will, keeping your right to choose or decline treatments, interventions, or life-sustaining measures is perhaps the most humanly fair. You may be unconscious when you use your living will, but it doesn?t mean you have to be stripped off of your right. Your living will would uphold this basic right even if you are oblivious to the rest of the world.

There’s a lot to understand about Living Will. We were able to provide you with some of the facts above, but there is still plenty more to write about in subsequent articles.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his soon to be top ranked Perpetual20 training site: Perpetual 20

Everyday, a number of people are bewildered in deciding whether to keep the life of a family member in a permanently vegetative state, not completely knowing what the incapacitated would really have wanted. Cases such as this have been discussed in many courts and caused family members to raise debates and disputes among themselves. Concerns about medical wishes, however, can be easily resolved with a living will. Although the fundamentals of a living will were not widely received decades ago, completing a living will have become more appealing in the recent years. In fact, 41% of the Americans made their living will in 2007.

A living will is a document in which a person determines the life-prolonging procedures, measures, or treatments he wants or doesn?t want to undergo in the event he is not in any capacity to decide for himself or communicate his preference. Essentially, it his written directives that would guide his physicians and other health care providers in the course of medical treatment. The person, through a living will, can tell if he wants to be revived through cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), be nourished through feeding tubes, or be supported through mechanical ventilation, among other things. If so, when and for how long does he intend to be on such support devices?

Living wills can be very specific, although at times it can be very general, which is why having a medical power of attorney (POA) is sometimes recommended. A POA is another document in which a person authorizes another individual to speak for him in case he has inability to do so and sometimes interpret the living will. This person, called health care agent or proxy, must know beforehand the other person?s preferences and medical wishes. In some states, living will and POA are in a combined form under the name Advance Directives.

Those of you not familiar with the latest on Living Will now have at least a basic understanding. But there’s more to come.

Living will is oftentimes associated with older people, but since all people are subject to any eventuality, it is recommended that anyone aged 18 and above should make a living will. This, of course, appears creepy to some people, but it has to be understood that making a living will lifts the emotional burden off the family members when the need to make medical decisions arrive. It can also spare the patient from prolonged suffering, if he, particularly, is beyond recovery. And this can likewise mean less financial spending for the professional and facility fees. But ultimately, it gives the patient the privilege to decide for himself even in comatose or vegetative state.

Laws on living will vary from state to state. Some states require living will to be notarized; others do not. There are also states that use standard living will form, and states that have specific instructions on making a living will. Before making a living will, therefore, it is important for a person to know the fundamentals of a living will in the state he is residing in. As soon as the living will is completed, copies must be distributed to loved ones, health care agent (if there is a signed POA), personal doctor, and, in case of hospitalization, attending physicians.

Changes can be made in the living will; however, these should be brought to the attention of all people concerned. The old living will, which must be destroyed, will then be superseded by the new version.

As your knowledge about Living Will continues to grow, you will begin to see how Living Will fits into the overall scheme of things. Knowing how something relates to the rest of the world is important too.

About the Author
By Dennis Pehrson, feel free to visit his top ranked site: Riches with Rentals

This interesting article addresses some of the key issues regarding Living Will. A careful reading of this material could make a big difference in how you think about Living Will.

A living will is a legal document where you authorize doctors to do and do not do certain medical procedures in you in case you become incapacitated or medically unconscious to make decisions or even speak. Many people are now including organ donation in their living will. This is a noble and admirable practice. Imagine how many people your organs could save when you die. That is like living your life to the fullest. Even in death, you could be sure you are contributing well to humanity.

You could always specify in your living will your desire to have any of your organs removed and donated to other people who need transplants. Some people still are not aware of this. You could even donate your body to medical schools that are always in need of corpses for medical and scientific studies. This way, you could make sure you could still help in the advancement of human knowledge on medicine and treatment. Your family might not fully agree with this notion, but it is something you have to clearly and patiently explain to them. Who knows, they might join you on your advocacy and decide to also donate their organs when they die.

Those of you not familiar with the latest on Living Will now have at least a basic understanding. But there’s more to come.

How do you include organ donation in your living will? The process could be as simple as getting a living will. First, you should check out any state or national legislations that may cover the process. Some states may have specific laws regarding such advance directives. You could consult your lawyer in this aspect. There are also several forms to fill out. Once the forms and the living will are done, produce several copies. Give a copy each to your doctor, your healthcare agent, and your family. You should also keep your own copy and keep it safe, but in a place where the household could easily find in case of emergency.

You do not need to be old to come out with your living will and to decide to donate your organs if you die. It is advisable that both living will and organ donation be decided and finalized the moment you reach 18 years old. There is no age limit as well. Even 70-year old and 80-year old individuals could opt to donate organs and include such a provision in their living will. You should always read your directives as often as possible. You could always opt to change or revise any term or provision depending on your choice. To make changes on your organ donation options in your living will, you could start the process all over again, as you did when you got the living will written.

You also need to register in your state?s donor registry. For convenience, you could have your organ donation option indicated in your driver?s license every year you renew it. You could also sign and always carry a donor card so that the procedure could go on any time something happens. Your living will should also clearly indicate that choice you make.

Now you can be a confident expert on Living Will. OK, maybe not an expert. But you should have something to bring to the table next time you join a discussion on Living Will.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, proud owner of this top ranked web hosting reseller site: GVO





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